Why Am I Not Successful? (Free Video)

mapping your shortest path to greater profits

Note: Our Marketing that Works training program referenced in the video has run its course and has been superseded by some other really amazing training programs. Check out some of the new training programs we’ve launched since then: the Audience Business Masterclass and Campaign Mastery.

Being a small business owner not only requires a lot of hard work and a gold nugget of an idea – it also requires a serious amount of resilience.

Because no matter how great your idea is, failure is inevitable (and even essential to growth). And no matter how great you are at iterating, there will be times when you reach a sticking point and feel unsure about what to do next.

It could be that you feel that you’re lacking time, or money.

Or even worse, it could be that you’re not quite sure what the missing piece of the puzzle is; all that you know is that there is something standing between you and your goals.

And it’s seriously getting you down.

But what if you could laser in on the biggest obstacle you’re facing right now in your business?

What if you could cut through the clutter and identify the one next step you need to take to become unstuck and continue on the path of your most ambitious dreams?

If you’ve ever asked yourself, “Why am I not successful?”, then this video is for you.

Danny and Peter share a powerful process to identify obstacles to business success – and after you watch the video, you’ll be equipped to apply it to your business to find out what is holding YOU back.

Did you like the video? Here’s what to do next…

If you want to connect with Matt Tanguay, our Firepole Marketing student who facilitated this whole process, you can check out his company Fluent Brain.

And as promised, you can download the whole Current Reality Tree that we mapped out in the video right here:

What did you think of the Current Reality Tree (CRT) process? Have you seen something like this before? Do you relate to Frank the Frustrated Entrepreneur? Leave a comment and let us know what you think!

is an author, strategist, serial entrepreneur, and proud co-founder of Firepole Marketing, the program that guarantees you will add $1,000 to your monthly bottom line. Go get it already!

Danny Iny (@DannyIny, +DannyIny), a.k.a. the "Freddy Krueger of Blogging", is the proud founder of Firepole Marketing. He is the author of the Amazon best-seller Engagement from Scratch! (available on Amazon, or for free in our Engagement Toolbox), and creator of the Audience Business Masterclass.

Comments

  1. says

    I know I’ve said it before Danny, but you’re an example of someone who is literally willing success into your life by bringing value to others. This program looks amazing bud!

    Marcus

  2. says

    This looks fantastic guys!

    The ideas are super organized and it’s easy to seep how this could be the life raft to help keep an online business from sinking. 

    Am really looking forward to the next videos!

    • Peter Vogopoulos says

      Thanks, Sean. It’s a common situation for most businesses, both online and offline. Glad to have you here!

    • says

      Thanks, Kristi!

      Do you agree with the conclusion of the video? We argue that whereas most businesses feel their biggest constraint is a lack of money or time, the real thing holding them back is a lack of training.

      Is that consistent with your experiences? Have you seen examples of that with your own audience?

      • says

        I’ve seen it be a myriad of issues.  Business don’t have the time or money to spend on training.  The ones that do train someone who later leaves and the business doesn’t want to invest in the time / money again to train the next person fearing they will do the same.  Or the business takes the time / money to train someone, and after the person is trained the business takes up that person’s time to do other projects.  

        • says

          Hmmm, it sounds to me like it’s the manager who’s making the decisions that needs better training! If they had that, then people wouldn’t be leaving as often, and resources would be better allocated! :D

          • says

            Good point… some are small businesses with under 10 employees, so if they lose that one, they’re in serious trouble.  Of course, that’s the reason they lose that employee – they put a lot of pressure on them to the point they just can’t handle it anymore.  Or so I’ve seen at least.

            • says

              Oh, it’s the hardest for businesses that small, because you’re right – they can’t afford to lose anyone, and at the same time they think they can’t afford to hire anyone else to reduce the workload a bit… so it’s a very “rock and a hard place” kind of situation.

              Now, what they really need is better training – if they learn to work smarter, instead of working more, then they can get more done, and don’t have to worry about hiring more people.

              The trouble is that it’s so hard to know what you don’t know. That’s why it can be so helpful to have a coach, mentor, or just more experienced friend who can hear about your challenges, and point you in the right direction. :)

            • says

              Oh, it’s the hardest for businesses that small, because you’re right – they can’t afford to lose anyone, and at the same time they think they can’t afford to hire anyone else to reduce the workload a bit… so it’s a very “rock and a hard place” kind of situation.

              Now, what they really need is better training – if they learn to work smarter, instead of working more, then they can get more done, and don’t have to worry about hiring more people.

              The trouble is that it’s so hard to know what you don’t know. That’s why it can be so helpful to have a coach, mentor, or just more experienced friend who can hear about your challenges, and point you in the right direction. :)

          • says

            Good point… some are small businesses with under 10 employees, so if they lose that one, they’re in serious trouble.  Of course, that’s the reason they lose that employee – they put a lot of pressure on them to the point they just can’t handle it anymore.  Or so I’ve seen at least.

  3. says

    Hey Danny, 

    I’m going to piggy-back a bit off of what Kristi said, but what if someone doesn’t have the money to buy the training…then money becomes the issue. Or the time to go through it…then time becomes the issue. I think training is important, but is it possible that it is a part of a cycle of ingredients that all have to fall into place.

    • says

      That’s a really great question, Eugene. And yes – if money and time are preventing someone from getting the training that they need, then it’s a real problem – but only because it’s keeping you from the training, and not just in and of itself.

      That being said, it’s hard to get the training you need without time or money, but it’s not impossible. If you dedicate 3-5 hours per week to doing the work, and you’re diligent about following the right people and asking for help, then you’ll get it.

      But it doesn’t have to be that hard… That’s why we structured the program the way we did; just $147/month for 6 months (every business can afford $147), and only a few hours a week. If it was a big chunk of money and tons of time in one shot, people wouldn’t be able to buy it, or go through it even if they did.

      Does this make sense to you, or do you think it’s really something else?

  4. says

    Danny you are super human!! I’m happy you’ve got this going on. Will definitely RT it for you!

    Annie told me you two met one day. Is she as crazy in person as she is online? ;)

  5. says

    Hey Danny, I’ve been thinking about this. 

    You’re absolutely right that training is important, but an entrepreneur can still get by without it, right?

    What if an entrepreneur doesn’t have training, but is smart enough to know their limitations. So rather than muscling their way through everything on their own, they learn to effectively outsource and reach out to the right people.

    Wouldn’t that still work?

    • says

      Hmmm… interesting question.

      I guess the answer is yes… and no.

      It’s not about the training, so much as it is about the know-how. If you know how to recognize your limits, and you know how to outsource properly, and you know how to delegate, and you know how to strategize (remember, it’s not just about executing tasks, it’s also about choosing the right tasks to execute), then you’re okay.

      But where would that know-how come from? It usually comes either from training, or from experience. And experience is training – it’s just the harder and longer way of getting that training, right?

      So given the choice between training from someone you know and trust, vs. training by getting bitch-slapped by the school of hard knocks for a few years – isn’t the actual training option more attractive?

      What do you think? Does that make sense?

    • says

      Hmmm… interesting question.

      I guess the answer is yes… and no.

      It’s not about the training, so much as it is about the know-how. If you know how to recognize your limits, and you know how to outsource properly, and you know how to delegate, and you know how to strategize (remember, it’s not just about executing tasks, it’s also about choosing the right tasks to execute), then you’re okay.

      But where would that know-how come from? It usually comes either from training, or from experience. And experience is training – it’s just the harder and longer way of getting that training, right?

      So given the choice between training from someone you know and trust, vs. training by getting bitch-slapped by the school of hard knocks for a few years – isn’t the actual training option more attractive?

      What do you think? Does that make sense?

      • says

        Yes, that makes perfect sense. 

        So you’re not saying effective training gives you the ability to “DO” it all, it’s that effective training gives you the ability to “SEE” it all, right?

        So if that’s the case, are there some people who are too blind to ever see? 

        • says

          Well, that’s a pretty bleak possibility. :P

          Actually, the answer is (again) yes and no. Most people can see when given the right help, but they sometimes choose not to, because at a subconscious level they’re sabotaging themselves. That’s actually at the root of a lot of “I don’t have time” complaints.

          So why are they sabotaging themselves? Well, for that you’ve got to watch our next video, on Wednesday… ;)

          But about your first point, that effective training let’s you see it all, rather than do it all… I think it’s a blurry line between one and the other. If you can see what will work, and you can see what you have to do in order to get it done… then what could be stopping you?

  6. Julie steelman says

    Such brilliant concepts in here!  Danny has it so right.  I have given this some thought before I commented.  It’s one of those chicken or egg questions.  I, too, have hesitated to buy into training programs and thought “I cannot afford it”.  And then looking at the results I have created on my own, it was clear things wouldn’t change.  The truth is, I cannot afford NOT to get the help I need to generate revenue beyond what I already know.  Hope that helps some of you make the decision to get the info you need!

    • says

      Thank you, Julie!

      That’s exactly the problem – it’s very “chicken and egg”, and without doing a really thorough analysis (which takes training!), you don’t see the whole cycle, or understand how to really break it.

      Of course, that’s what we’re here to help with… ;)

    • says

      I totally agree. When Danny & Peter first told me about their Firepole Marketing project, I was convinced right away that this was amazing value. I went through the program and it’s moved my business forward in many ways! I am still benefiting from and applying what I learned in the Firepole Marketing program.

  7. says

    For some reason the video got stuck for me at “let’s magically add 5 hours to your day” part.

    You definitely nailed it with this one, guys.

    IMHO, what we all need to do is to learn how to focus on things that actually make you money during the hours that you DO have and cut out everything that doesn’t.

    Thoughts?

    • says

      Hmmm… not sure why that happened – were you able to reload, and scroll ahead to finish the video?

      You’re exactly right that it’s about focusing on the things that actually make you money in the time that you do have… but what are those things?

      If you’re a pro, then you know what they are. But if you’re a pro, you’ve probably already got lots of customers, money, support staff, and therefor time, too.

      And if you’re starting out, you don’t have any of these things – nor do you have the knowledge about what works and what doesn’t.

      And how do you get that knowledge? That’s where training comes in, right? ;)

  8. Noronha Mariam says

    Hey Danny and Peter

    I loved the UDEs and the way you guys put things in to proper perspective by linking these as cause and effects) and filling in the gaps therein.  I’m sure every entrepreneur who is frustrated is plagued by these UDEs.  The best part is how you guys put across the importance and strategies to braek the circle.

    • says

      I find that often it is hard to get that perspective. It’s good to step back, look at your situation and use the CRT process to figure out what’s really going on, and how you can break the cycles.

  9. Eugene Nayvelt says

    Hey Danny,

    This was great. So many “A-Ha” moments while watching this video. The breakdown was extremely helpful in showing why training is the place to start, before the issue of money and time come into play. But, what about those business owners that don’t just lack confidence, but specifically lack the confidence that the training will actually work for them? Or that they might invest in the training and lack the confidence to implement what they are taught? 

    It seems that many business owners don’t invest in training because they just look at it as an added expense, rather than an investment into their business. How should they approach this?

  10. Eugene Nayvelt says

    Hey Danny,

    This was great. So many “A-Ha” moments while watching this video. The breakdown was extremely helpful in showing why training is the place to start, before the issue of money and time come into play. But, what about those business owners that don’t just lack confidence, but specifically lack the confidence that the training will actually work for them? Or that they might invest in the training and lack the confidence to implement what they are taught? 

    It seems that many business owners don’t invest in training because they just look at it as an added expense, rather than an investment into their business. How should they approach this?

  11. Eugene says

    Hey Danny,

    This was great. So many “A-Ha” moments while watching this video. The breakdown was extremely helpful in showing why training is the place to start, before the issue of money and time come into play. But, what about those business owners that don’t just lack confidence, but specifically lack the confidence that the training will actually work for them? Or that they might invest in the training and lack the confidence to implement what they are taught? 

    It seems that many business owners don’t invest in training because they just look at it as an added expense, rather than an investment into their business. How should they approach this?

    • says

      Very good questions, Eugene!

      Lacking confidence is one thing, and lacking confidence in a particular training program is another – for that, you just have to work with someone who you trust, and who you trust *to deliver* on their promise to you.

      As for confidence to implement, that’s the same as any other lack of confidence – for one of several reasons, they’re sabotaging themselves, and keeping themselves from real success. As for why that is – you’ll just have to watch the video on Wednesday! :D

      But yeah, it’s a big problem that organizations see training as an expense, rather than an investment. Know-how is the engine that drives business success, and too many businesses are far too casual about shutting that engine down.

      I guess in some ways, it’s going to be a leap of faith. No matter how impressive a guarantee might be (hell, we offer a $1,000/month guarantee!), there’s still some risk and uncertainty. But if you don’t ever take a chance, you’ll never see any result.

      Does that make sense? You’ve been in the program for a while now – what would you say to someone who asked you these questions?

    • Peter Vogopoulos says

      Hi Eugene,

      I’ve got little to add to Danny’s reply.
      When you are talking about lacking confidence in a particular training program, you are describing what we call in the FPM program “performance anxiety” (no, not that kind, you dirty mind). It’s one of the three customer anxieties that block the way to the sale. Essentially, as with any purchase, we are worried whether it will deliver what it promises.

      The perennial problem with all training and education is dotting the line between it and tangible ROI. And that’s hard to do without gathering the right data. If you got it, great. But if you don’t, you can’t invent it. One corporate training company I used to work with promised a 20% productivity boost from one of its programs. That’s a hefty promise. It’s a neat sounding claim until someone challenges it by saying, “So if I send my people to this course next week, I can lay off 1 in every 5 the week after?”

      For the person responsible for marketing such a training, the issues you brought up are usually best countered with the right customer stories. If you are provided example of people who had the same concerns as you did, but took the leap of faith that Danny talks about and got what they hoped for, then you feel better about taking the training. Social proof — it’s a powerful thing.

  12. Eugene says

    Hey Danny,

    This was great. So many “A-Ha” moments while watching this video. The breakdown was extremely helpful in showing why training is the place to start, before the issue of money and time come into play. But, what about those business owners that don’t just lack confidence, but specifically lack the confidence that the training will actually work for them? Or that they might invest in the training and lack the confidence to implement what they are taught? 

    It seems that many business owners don’t invest in training because they just look at it as an added expense, rather than an investment into their business. How should they approach this?

  13. Mary |A-list Blog Marketing says

    This was very interesting, guys! I agree that training is the key to success – in anything you attempt. I started as newbie blogger 3 years ago and have since built a six-figure online business. The key thing I did was to invest in education. Some people gripe at paying $2000 for online courses – but compared to a Uni degree that’s cheap as chips, isn’t it?!

    The great thing is that in time, education combines with experience – so the  money you initially invest in education is a “gift that keeps on giving.”

    I love your site and will come here often! One small thing put me off: I didn’t like being asked for a tweet in return for the gift. I would have happily given you my email address and subscribed, but being ‘forced’ to give a tweet put me off. I’m usually really happy to support bloggers with a tweet. It’s like a gift of appreciation. There’s something weird about someone ‘demanding’ your gift of appreciation.

    Mark you, I’m not complaining. I’m just interested in my reaction. I’m going to use it for a post about ‘edgy’ marketing techniques :-) It’s all good learning.

    I look forward to the next video

    • says

      Thanks, Mary! And it sounds like you did exactly the right thing – get professional help, from the start.

      You draw a really good analogy with a university degree – people expect to pay for education in most contexts. It’s just that when it comes to business training, and particularly the internet, there’s this assumption that information should be free, or else you should just know it all to start with (which makes no sense!).

      I understand where you’re coming from about the tweet. Our take on it is that you’re tweeting about the video that you watched, which is why you want the handout – if you didn’t think the video was worth sharing, then you wouldn’t want the handout. There are definitely different approaches to this sort of thing, though, and your point is well taken.

      Please send me the link to the post about edgy marketing – I’ll be happy to spread the word about it!

      See you tomorrow, when the next video is up,

      • Peter Vogopoulos says

        “Cheap as chips” — loved that.

        Thanks for sharing, point well taken about the tweet. Interestingly, I remember someone telling me that they were happy to tweet it, because they resent giving out their email address — so.. interesting how different approaches work for different people! The challenges of the marketer! How I love this business. :-)

  14. says

    Danny and Peter – Great video, well done guys! I was wondering as I was watching it though, are there other factors that may play a bigger part than just no money and time, therefore something that training won’t necessarily fix?

    There was some discussion in the video about lack of confidence. I am working on the next post for my blog and it is about recognizing your own strengths. Is it possible that for some people the real root of their problem is that they are paralyzed by fear or suffer from a serious lack of confidence in themselves? What do you guys think? How would someone overcome something like that if they really have a burning urge to start something….but fear still stops them dead in their tracks from actually taking any action (like getting training)?

    • says

      Thanks, Lisa!

      And yes, you’re absolutely right – there are two reasons why things don’t get done – one is the lack of training, and the other is the lack of confidence, that leaves people sabotaging themselves. That’s what our next video is about (tomorrow) – so stay tuned. :)

      Hint: the question to ask is *why* are they stopped dead in their tracks? What are they afraid of?

      • says

        In my opinion, it comes down to the two basic human fears:

        1) Not being enough. By failing at something, you are showing others that you’re not enough (or so people think).
        2) Consequently, not being loved

        What do you think?

        • says

          Hey Matt, I’ve heard that explanation before, and I think it has some validity, but I also think it over-simplifies things; maybe that’s the fear that’s at the end of the road most of the time, but does that model do enough to help people get to the point of dealing with it?

          • says

            That’s a good point. I find it simply gives me perspective on situations where I’m afraid. I understand deep down what’s really going on. I think that awareness, or recognizing what’s happening, is the first step towards finding a solution.

            2011/8/24 Disqus

        • Peter Vogopoulos says

          Interesting points you bring up.

          I agree with this, actually, but taking it one step deeper. If one believes that they are “not enough” then by failing again and again they are validating that paradigm to themselves and others. It’s confirmation that their (unproductive and harmful) beliefs about themselves are true. 

          The subsequent “there-there poor thing, that’s okay” from the onlookers eager to validate this harmful perception of themselves is exactly what is needed to make them feel better about their situation. 

          If it sounds like a drug, it’s because it is. But like any short-term fix, it’s short-lived. It’s a short-term payoff that many people don’t want to lose, despite it costing them their long-term happiness and success.

    • Peter Vogopoulos says

      Thanks, Lisa.  

      I can go on about this for ages. Maybe there is a post or two here, the topic is of great interest to every small business owner, for sure. 

      When fear stops us in our tracks there are so many reasons why that might happen, I think. We’ve explored some in the video that was released today (Video #2) and there are more in the bonus module of the Firepole Marketing Program.  I hope you like the video!

  15. Stuart Mills says

    You’ve certainly being keeping things busy here guys, I can see why you asked for a guest post from me for September ;-)

    I can see the problem here – how do you know when to ‘take the plunge’ and buy into training? How can you be sure that the training you get is right for you, and which justifies the money you’ve spent? Different trainers have different ways, and certain ways are always better suited for certain people. 

    I think it definitely helps to get as much ‘free training’ as possible, time permitting – researching, reading, asking questions, anything which is free that you can learn from will be a great help. After that, the next step is paying for training, but if you’ve done the appropriate research beforehand, then you’ll be in a better position to decide which training is best suited for you, your company, and your needs :-)

    • says

      Hey Stu, yeah, things are definitely busy, but the guest post is more about having some breathing room while I’m away on my honeymoon… ;)

      I think that’s a great question – basically, even if you’ve accepted that you need training, how do you know which training to get? Which will be a good fit for your learning style, and which will be best for you?

      Part of it is knowing enough to know what you don’t know – and yeah, that’s where the free learning comes in. Once you understand enough to know what’s missing, you can find someone to help you fill in the gaps.

      The other side of it is getting professional help, from someone that you trust. Free learning is a part of this, too, since it’s the free information that helps you to evaluate how good someone really is. :)

      • says

        Eben Pagan introduces an interesting concept called “Moving the Free Line”. He suggests to give a huge load of free valuable advice, then lead the prospects through the sales funnel.

        That way, people get a good feel for what that product or service is about… and people feel they get a lot more for their money.

          • says

            Right. I actually just got an email from Eben Pagan (I’m on his list in case it sounded like he’s a personal friend – I don’t know him personally yet ;)) about people “on the fence”. He encouraged people to make a decision. Either NOT BUYING his program, or BUYING IT. I thought that was an interesting call to action.

            2011/8/24 Disqus

      • Peter Vogopoulos says

        I’d also add — look at the usual elements that help you figure out if there is a fit: case studies, testimonials, other student’s own words and of course, money-back guarantees can’t hurt. 

        I do business with an outfit in Western Canada that basically pays you back your whole certification fee if you decide by the end of the training week it’s not for you. Such believability items sure help the decision.

  16. Jk Allen says

    Hey Danny,

    You continue to increase the stakes and step up your performance…time and time again. The video was high quality – highly informative and I know that companies are going to go wild to take advantage of the training that you have to offer them.

  17. Darshni says

    Great great Video Danny. You guys have done a great job. I could actually relate my business to it. The UDE’s are great. You have broked the circle in the best way. I am hoping to take my business to next level by subscribing to the program. I do have few queries which i would email you. Thanks once again for the great video. I am eagerly awaiting for the second one.

    • says

      That’s great, Darshni, I’m glad to hear it, and we’re very happy to have you in the program! :)

      For sure, send me any questions that you have, and I’ll respond within 24 hours (that’s part of what you get as a student!). :D

    • says

      That’s great, Darshni, I’m glad to hear it, and we’re very happy to have you in the program! :)

      For sure, send me any questions that you have, and I’ll respond within 24 hours (that’s part of what you get as a student!). :D

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